Skip to main content
It looks like you're using Internet Explorer 11 or older. This website works best with modern browsers such as the latest versions of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Edge. If you continue with this browser, you may see unexpected results.

OER: Open Educational Resources

Textbooks

      Introduction to California Government and Politicsbook cover by Steven Reti (2019): College of the Canyons. 

Each chapter explores California politics using a mixture of political philosophy, political theory, and contemporary and historical political evidence. The contours of California politics follow in many ways national patterns of political culture and conflict. Lockean promotions of rights and liberties and Madisonian concerns for checks and balances are very evident in the push and pull among people for influence. California has also been significantly shaped by late nineteenth and early twentieth-century Progressives with their emphases on populism, on the rational scientific management of public policy by professionalized government bureaucracies, and welcoming reforms of all sorts to achieve these twin goals of democratization and good government. The spirit of Progressivism is alive and well in California with more calls for popular involvement in politics, reforms of the electoral processes, efforts to change government procedures, and, of course, the constant drive to develop more effective and popular public policies.


 

book cover      Attenuated Democracy: A Critical Introduction to U.S. Government and Politics by David Hubert (2020): Salt Lake 
      Community College. 

To attenuate something is to make it weak or thin. Democracy in America has been thin from the beginning and continues to be so despite some notable progress in voting rights. As political scientists Benjamin Page and Martin Gilens wrote, “The essence of democracy is not just having reasonably satisfactory policies; the essence of democracy is popular control of government, with each citizen having an equal voice.” Since this is likely to be your only college-level course on the American political system, it is important to point out the structural weaknesses of our system and the thin nature of our democracy. Whenever you get the chance—in the voting booth, in your job, perhaps if you hold elected office—I encourage you to do something about America’s attenuated democracy.


undefined      A Primer on Politics by T.M. Sell (2014).

This book should provide students with a basic outline of politics, what it means and how it works. The book will attempt to demystify the political world, and make it relevant by showing how things actually work and why -- how political systems divide the spoils and spread the burdens of civilized life; how economic and political systems intersect; and how approaches to politics have evolved to bring us where we are today.

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike


       American Government 2E by Glen Krutz et al (2019): OpenStax.

American Government 2e is designed to meet the scope and sequence requirements of the single-semester American Government course. This title includes innovative features designed to enhance student learning, including Insider Perspective features and a Get Connected module that shows students how they can get engaged in the political process. The book provides an important opportunity for students to learn the core concepts of American Government and understand how those concepts apply to their lives and the world around them. 


      American Government and Politics in the Information Age by Various Authors (2016): UM Libraries Publishing.

Governments possess power—the ability to gain compliance and to get people under their jurisdiction to obey them—and they may exercise their power by using the police and military to enforce their decisions. However, power need not involve the exercise of force or compulsion; people often obey because they think it is in their interest to do so, they have no reason to disobey, or they fear punishment. Above all, people obey their government because it has authority; its power is seen by people as rightfully held, as legitimate. People can grant their government legitimacy because they have been socialized to do so; because there are processes, such as elections, that enable them to choose and change their rulers; and because they believe that their governing institutions operate justly. 


book cover      Introduction to Political Science Research Methods by Josh Franco, Charlotte Lee et al (2020): ASCCC OERI.

Introduction to Political Science Research Methods, 1st edition, is an Open Education Resource Textbook that surveys the research methods employed in political science. The textbook includes chapters that cover: history and development of the empirical study of politics; the scientific method; theories, hypotheses, variables, and units; conceptualization, operationalization and measurement of political concepts; elements of research design including the logic of sampling; qualitative and quantitative research methods and means of analysis; and research ethics.


      Leading with Cultural Intelligence by Mai Moua (2012): Saylor Foundation. 

The purpose of Leading With Cultural Intelligence by Mia Moua is to outline the important ideas of cultural intelligence and the steps that must be considered and then practiced to become a culturally intelligent leader. The most important aspect covered within this book is that cultural intelligence is both a strategy and a tool towards cultural competency and proficiency. This book outlines the importance of understanding culture and its impact on organizations, the strategic value of cultural intelligence, and the significance of integrating and practicing cultural intelligence in everyday business life. When all these aspects are properly integrated and applied in the leadership and management process, organizations are more innovative and adaptable to respond to cultural changes

.


      Democracy in Brief by U.S. Department of State Bureau of International Information Programs (2019): BC Campus.

Democracy in Brief touches on topics such as rights and responsibilities of citizens, free and fair elections, the rule of law, the role of a written constitution, separation of powers, a free media, the role of parties and interest groups, military-civilian relations and democratic culture. 


       International Relations by Stephen McGlinchey (2016): University of West England.

This book is designed to be a ‘Day 0' introduction to International Relations. As a beginner's guide, it has been structured to condense the most important information into the smallest space and present that information in the most accessible way. The chapters offer a broad sweep of the basic components of International Relations and the key contemporary issues that concern the discipline. The narrative arc forms a complete circle, taking readers from no knowledge to competency. The journey starts by examining how the international system was formed and ends by reflecting that International Relations is always adapting to events and is therefore a never-ending journey of discovery. Unlike typical textbooks, there are no boxes, charts, pictures or exercises. The philosophy underpinning this book is that these things can be a distraction. This book, like others in the E-IR Foundations series, is designed to capture attention with an engaging narrative. The chapters are short, with simple paragraphs and clear sentences placing the reader inside crucial issues and debates so they can understand how things work, and where they fit in the world around them.


book cover      21st Century American Government and Politics by David Paletz (2012): University of Minnesota Libraries Publishing. 

In covering American government and politics, our text introduces the intricacies of the Constitution, the complexities of federalism, the meanings of civil liberties, and the conflicts over civil rights explains how people are socialized to politics, acquire and express opinions, and participate in political life; describes interest groups, political parties, and elections—the intermediaries that link people to government and politics; details the branches of government and how they operate; and shows how policies are made and affect people’s lives.

Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike

Courses

Additional Resources

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.